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Chomsky, Noam


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2 articles of this author have been cited in the European Press Review so far.


Le Monde Diplomatique - France | 01/08/2007

Noam Chomky demands absolute freedom of expression

The American intellectual Noam Chomsky considers that in Europe, "freedom of expression is defined in a very restrictive manner." Interviewed by Daniel Mermet, he develops this notion. "In my opinion, the essential question is whether the State has the right to determine what historical truth is and punish anyone who strays from it? An affirmative answer is utterly Stalinist. French intellectuals have a hard time admitting that this is how they are inclined. And yet ... The State should not have the right to punish anyone who believes the sun goes round Earth. There is something very elementary about freedom of expression: either you defend it in the case of opinions you abhor, or you don't defend it at all. ... There is something distressing and scandalous about having to debate these questions two centuries after Voltaire declared: 'I will defend my opinions to my dying day, but will die for you to be able to defend yours'."

Libération - France | 28/06/2006

Noam Chomsky on the ethics of war

In an analysis for the International Herald Tribune reprinted by several European newspapers, the American linguist Noam Chomsky, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, questions the doctrine of the 'just war', which "has had a renaissance among scholars and even among policy-makers. Concepts aside, actions in the real world all too often reinforce the maxim of Thucydides that "the strong do as they can, while the weak suffer what they must" — which is not only indisputably unjust, but at the present stage of human civilization, a literal threat to the survival of the species. ... By 'just war', counterterrorism or some other rationale, the US exempts itself from the fundamental principles of world order that it played the primary role in formulating and enacting."

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