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Stürmer, Michael


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4 articles of this author have been cited in the European Press Review so far.


Welt am Sonntag - Germany | 29/09/2013

Phone conversation with Obama buys Iran time

US President Barack Obama and his Iranian counterpart Hassan Rouhani had a telephone conversation on Friday. This was the first such contact between the leaders of the two countries since 1979. The conservative Sunday paper Welt am Sonntag warns about attaching too much importance to this development in the process of reconciliation: "It is interesting as a gesture that signals a softer stance but not a breakthrough paving the way for peace. ... Will the US and its allies manage to foil the Iranians' bid for the bomb without launching a military intervention with incalculable consequences? ... [Rouhani's] conduct in New York was more conciliatory in tone and message than that of his half-crazed predecessor Ahmadinejad. As regards content the policy continues to be refuting, buying time and continuing as before. The toughened sanctions hurt - because Russia is joining in since Iran's bomb would change all the maps. Faced with the miserable economic situation Tehran must reckon with further unrest. The mullahs are learning that the nuclear weapon will come at a high cost."

Die Welt - Germany | 18/09/2012

Risky power struggle over resources

Underlying the dispute over a couple of uninhabited groups of islands is a bitter struggle for supremacy in the Far East and possibly precious raw materials, the conservative daily Die Welt notes: "In truth what this is about is who owns the East China Sea: China or Japan? ... And the question is not merely symbolic. The new maritime law of the United Nations makes territorial sovereignty over the most barren cliffs located far from inhabited coastlines a means of claiming the natural resources that lie beneath the seabed. ... Like in the South China Sea, the conflict to the north is also about mineral resources, gas and oil. It won't result in a war, but it is a jousting for supremacy. The alarming thing about it is that as far as territorial limits or even effective arms control goes, the new power relations in the Far East are still underdeveloped or even nonexistent. But uncontrolled experimenting in power politics in the Far East is the last thing that a crisis-stricken world now needs."

Die Welt - Germany | 22/12/2010

On the way to becoming an authoritarian state

The newly created Authority for Media Supervision in Hungary (NMHH) will have far-reaching powers for controlling the public media and sanctioning newspapers and websites. A veritable monstrosity, the conservative daily Die Welt concludes: "From censorship to the confiscation of documents to the material ruin of critical media, this is everything an authoritarian government could wish for. What we have here is nothing short of a ministry for controlling public opinion and glorification of the powers that be. The top jobs go to party hacks and minions of Prime Minister Viktor Orbán. ... If Austria's interlude with Jörg Haider was an operette, what's happening in Hungary is a full-fledged tragedy. The only difference is that the European Union still bothered to take exception to what was going on in Austria, and punished the country by relegating it to the penalty corner. In the case of Hungary nothing is happening at all, although it's clear the country is on the path to becoming an authoritarian state, and that this hasn't happened overnight. The freedom that Hungary won for itself and others two decades ago is on the verge of being lost."

Die Welt - Germany | 22/04/2009

South Africa is not lost yet

Jacob Zuma, head of the South African ruling ANC, is going to the polls assured of victory. The conservative daily Die Welt wonders if he has the strength to bring about reforms that can reconcile the country with itself and instill a sense of confidence among the white population: "Zuma is many things, but he is no visionary. He is devoid of charisma, but full of tricks and brutality. He now says that one term in office will be enough, and that is supposed to sound reassuring. But also in Africa the appetite comes while you are eating. It doesn't say much for the country's future that the long list presented by the prosecutor's office did not by any means work to his disadvantage. A two-thirds majority in parliament would bode ill not only for the courageous opposition, but also for South Africa and its standing in the world - the country was recently a respected participant at the G20 summit in London. Things will remain calm until the FIFA World Cup in 2010. After that it's anyone's bet what will happen. But South Africa is not lost yet."

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