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Strzyga, Lucjan


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2 articles of this author have been cited in the European Press Review so far.


Polska - Poland | 30/03/2010

Poland agonises over mosques

The residents of a Warsaw district are opposing the construction of a mosque in their neighbourhood. The daily Polska attributes this to the limited outlook of many Poles: "Why is it that the building of a mosque arouses so much emotion in a country that has more kebab stalls than churches? ... It looks a bit like the Poles have closed their eyes to the fact that the world hasn't stood still. Because the real battle between the Western world and Islam hasn't even taken place yet in Poland. The demographic problems of France and Germany's difficulties with its Turkish minority are alien to us. And we don't need to hold a referendum like the Swiss, who couldn't come to terms with the number of minarets being built there."

Polska - Poland | 29/04/2009

The Super-Czech on the silver screen

The documentary film Obcan Havel (Citizen Havel) about former Czech president Václav Havel comes out in Polish cinemas on Friday. Lucjan Strzyga praises the "Super-Czech on the silver screen", as well as the film's directors Miroslav Janek and Pavel Koutecký: "This is probably the longest documentary anyone has ever shot about a state leader. The camera accompanied Václav Havel over several decades - from the moment he became president of the Czech Republic after the Velvet Revolution to his retirement from politics. It was in 2003 that he left the president's office to his successor and political rival Václav Klaus. But in Citizen Havel we also see images of the famous Czech in his role as ex-president. The film's statistics are extraordinary. Its creators ... have pulled off an enormous feat, editing hundreds of hours of footage first down to 45 hours, and then down to just 119 minutes for this film version. The result is a compressed portrait of the 73-year-old statesman who has become a political legend in his own lifetime."

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