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Steiner, Elisabeth


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2 articles of this author have been cited in the European Press Review so far.


Der Standard - Austria | 18/03/2010

The end of bilingual Carinthia

Ninety years ago the Carinthian Slovenes voted in favour of southern Carinthia remaining part of Austria. It is high time Vienna imposed bilingual place-name signs in the Austrian state of Carinthia, the daily Der Standard writes, but doubts this will be achieved: "Nothing will come of it once more because Austria's politicians ... are too cowardly to ignore the members of the [national conservative] Freedom Party of Austria in particular and the populist yellow press. And on the other side too, the scenario is pitiful. The Council of Carinthian Slovenes threatens to break up owing to its misguided ethnic policy. It is pushing for a new joint representation organisation, which would make sense, but at the same time it accuses the other Slovene associations of betrayal because they are seeking a political solution to the place-name dispute with the 'reactionary' Carinthian Homeland Service. The Council is thus doing the ethnic group, whose members have had enough of their functionaries' self-promotion and fear that the bilingual Carinthia is slowly but surely disappearing, a great disservice."

Der Standard - Austria | 14/02/2008

Ban on minarets in Carinthia

Jörg Haider, the right-wing populist premier of the Austrian state of Carinthia, has tabled a law that would make it impossible to build mosques in the state. Two percent of the population of Carinthia is Muslim. Elisabeth Steiner writes: "With the aid of a 'special commission on local architecture' it will in practice be possible to stop the future construction of 'unusual buildings' that do not accord with the architectural traditions of Carinthia and Central European culture. It has apparently been forgotten that the Bosnian Muslims, for instance, who are now the main group of Muslims in Carinthia, once formed an elite unit in the army of the Habsburg monarchy. This monarchy recognised Islam as a religious community in 1912. And indeed it was for this reason that the first attempt to introduce such a law, which contained an explicit ban on building mosques and minarets, failed. For this would have denied Muslims the right to practice their religion."

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