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Sprūde, Viesturs


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2 articles of this author have been cited in the European Press Review so far.


Latvijas Avize - Latvia | 20/10/2010

Russian textbook falsifies history

The Moscow professors Alexandr Barsenkov and Alexandr Vdovin have co-authored the university textbook Russian History from 1917 to 2009. The daily Latvijas Avīze criticises numerous distortions of history: "Stalin is whitewashed and blame for the terror is put squarely on the shoulders of the secret service NKVD. But nothing is said about who gave the orders or signed the death sentences. Chechen representatives are now saying they will file charges because the book maintains that 63 percent of the Chechen soldiers conscripted during World War II deserted and sympathised with the Nazis. However these dubious figures were circulated at the time to justify the deportations of Chechens at the end of the war. For us it would be interesting to know to what extent the national minorities in the Soviet Union enjoyed greater rights than those in Western Europe. This book could still have far-reaching consequences."

Latvijas Avize - Latvia | 02/09/2009

Poles want apology for Katyń

The daily Latvijas Avīze stresses how important the commemoration ceremony marking the anniversary of the outbreak of the war is for Poland: "Those who say the Latvians are making too much fuss about their past and the historical revision of the Soviet occupation haven't seen what's been going on in Poland these days. Hitler and Stalin, both regarded by the Poles as the initiators of the war, stare out at you from all the newspaper and magazines and it's impossible to ignore the 70th anniversary of the German attack on Poland. … Surveys show that a clear majority of Poles would have liked to see [Russian Prime Minister Vladimir] Putin apologise for the Red Army's attack of 17 September 1939 on eastern Poland and also for the Katyń [massacre] at the ceremony in Gdańsk. That would have drawn a line under the past and enabled a new chapter in relations to begin. But for now this remains a dream."

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