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Kreutzfeldt, Malte


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2 articles of this author have been cited in the European Press Review so far.


Die Tageszeitung taz - Germany | 22/09/2015

Politicians still fawning over carmakers

Following the Volkswagen Group's admission that emmissions tests had been manipulated the value of shares in the company dropped by more than 20 percent on Monday. But just as alarming as Volkswagen's audacity is the German government's reaction to the scandal, the left-leaning daily taz chides: "What the responsible Ministry of Transport is not doing is quickly setting up investigations similar to those that led to the discovery of the scandal in the US, so as to clear up whether illegal manipulations have also taken place in Europe. Instead the government is in all seriousness demanding that VW provide it with information about whether it has also committed fraud in Germany. And that's all for now. Such naivete, such helplessness is shocking. Unfortunately, however, it's symptomatic of the German government's dealings with the carmaker: instead of introducing controls and regulations, the government regularly acts as its highest-placed interest group."

Die Tageszeitung taz - Germany | 07/12/2012

Germany thwarts EU reform plans

One week before the EU summit, Council President Herman Van Rompuy has presented proposals for restructuring the European economic and monetary union. However the euro bonds Germany has rejected all along are no longer part of the plan, the left-leaning daily taz criticises: "The division of the Eurozone into those who suffer from the crisis and those who profit from it continues. And this despite the fact that it's a matter of course that members of a stable monetary union should all pay the same interest rates. Within Germany no one doubts that the same rate should apply in Bremen and Bavaria. But within Europe uniform interest rates based on common liability are maligned as 'interest-rate socialism'. This way of bowing to pressure to the detriment of a decisive goal does not augur well for other issues. Van Rompuy's proposal for financial equilibrium among states - or their social insurance systems - is a good idea. However it seems very unlikely that it stands much chance of success against the resistance we can once again expect from Berlin."

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