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Kobosko, Michał


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2 articles of this author have been cited in the European Press Review so far.


Wprost - Poland | 28/12/2012

The Eurozone has survived

There were several times in 2012 when it looked like the Eurozone might collapse, but somehow everything has taken a turn for the better, Michał Kobosko, chief editor of the conservative news magazine Wprost writes, describing the zig-zag course of the Eurozone as the most astounding phenomenon of the year: "To sum up, this has been a very strange year. A year in which initially everything was decided too hastily, precisely because everything seemed so predictable. And yet many things turned out differently. True, somehow we all knew the Eurozone would survive. And yet we have watched a political and economic thriller unfold which has robbed us of our senses. Greece was supposed to go down, but it got back on its feet. Italy was on its knees, Portugal was to go bankrupt and the Spanish took to the streets in protest. But in the end the politicians did their homework to preserve this wobbly structure. ... And in doing so they have achieved their goal despite everything."

Wprost - Poland | 02/07/2012

Poland's problems after the championship

Taken as a whole the Euro 2012 football championship was a success for Poland, writes journalist Michal Kobosko in the conservative news magazine Wprost, but he also notes: "It's clear that not all that glitters is gold. Since Euro 2012 we have excellent roads but a growing number of firms that built them are filing for bankruptcy. And we have stadiums that we don't quite know what to do with. They are supposed to generate revenue at some point. ... Euro 2012 has also left us with a kind of football hangover because yet again we played badly. ... And we have something that could be called the Polish-Ukrainian complex. Not that I love [the radio presenters] Wojewodzki and Figurski for their nonsense. But they did highlight highlight a problem that has long been swept under the carpet: the contempt for Ukrainians. … We have a lot of homework left to do."

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