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Anson, Luis María


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4 articles of this author have been cited in the European Press Review so far.


El Mundo - Spain | 22/10/2015

Spain's Ciudadanos party may become kingmaker

Two months before Spain's general election on December 20 the polls point to the ruling People's Party (PP) losing its absolute majority and having to form a coalition with the protest party Ciudadanos if it wants to remain in power. In that case the latter's leader Albert Rivera would, however, insist that current prime minister Mariano Rajoy step down, the conservative daily El Mundo believes: "Despite the volatile polls, the indications are that Albert Rivera will be the kingmaker after the election. … Judging by the data we have now, things seem clear: Albert Rivera will become the key figure and Mariono Rajoy will be finished even though the PP emerges as the strongest party. The current president, who has managed the economy splendidly but delivered a mediocre performance politically, will be obliged to submit to the demands of Ciudadanos or to make way for a leftist coalition according to the Portuguese model."

El Mundo - Spain | 25/07/2013

Anson Luis María Anson on taming not destroying corrupt parties

All the major Spanish parties are currently embroiled in sensational corruption scandals. The people's growing weariness with party politics should not lead them to turn their backs completely on institutions that are vital for democracy, the prominent Spanish journalist Luis María Anson warns in the conservative daily El Mundo: "The political parties being discredited and then eliminated was what led to the victory of the darkest totalitarian regimes: Stalinism in Russia, fascism in Italy, Nazism in Germany, Francoism in Spain, Salarzarism in Portugal. … While we condemn the corruption of the parties in the 21st century, we must at the same time point out that they are necessary for a functioning pluralist democracy. The same goes for the trade unions. Abuses must be denounced, but we must exercise caution in the way this is done. It's not about eliminating the parties, but bringing them to heel; not destroying them but regenerating them. We should always bear this in mind."

El Mundo - Spain | 20/12/2012

Pact against Catalonia's separatists needed

In Catalonia, the conservative regionalist CiU and the left-wing separatist ERC parties on Wednesday presented a timetable for Catalonia's path towards independence. It includes a referendum in 2014. The Spanish central government under Mariano Rajoy must join forces with the opposition to stop the separatists' advance, the conservative daily El Mundo demands: "Public opinion expects a convincing answer from the two major parties to the challenge posed by Arturo Mas and his new far-left partner, the ERC. … The prime minister should summon the leader of the opposition and together they should compose a joint declaration by the two parties. They need to let the general public know that the People's Party and the Socialists reject the referendum pact between the CiU and the ERC and that, in keeping with their promises and vows, they will comply with the constitution and ensure that it is complied with."

El Mundo - Spain | 06/09/2012

Merkel should not abuse her power in Madrid

German Chancellor Angela Merkel will meet her Spanish counterpart Marian Rajoy for talks in Madrid today. She shouldn't abuse her vast power, the conservative daily El Mundo advises: "Angela Merkel arrives in Madrid with more power than Hitler had when he met with the dictator Franco in [the French-Spanish border town of] Hendaye [to persuade him to side with Germany in 1940]. … The chancellor benefits from being able to borrow money at around one percent interest while Italy and Spain are paying six or seven percent. But Germany should not pull the noose around Spain's neck too tightly because choking these two major nations will also endanger Germany's prosperity. Too much greed is unhealthy. The chancellor must stop abusing the situation. It would already be a good deal for her if Spain and Italy paid three to four percent for their debts and the risk premium was kept below 300 basis points while the Germans continue to pay just roughly one percent."

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